Artists

Amartuvshin Enkhbat, Baritone

Amartuvshin was born in Sukhbaatar, Mongolia. He graduated as an opera singer from the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2009 and is the Principal Soloist of the State Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre of Mongolia. He became an Honored Artist of Mongolia at the age of 24.

Amartuvshin received the first prize of the Placido Domingo OPERALIA Competition in 2012, the 2nd prize and two special prizes at the International Singing Contest Francisco Vinas in Barcelona in 2013 and the 2nd prize and the public prize at the XIV International Tchaikovsky Competition in 2011.

He has performed on stage in numerous roles, including both Morales and Escamillo in Bizet’s Carmen, Laudon in Biligzhargal’s Repentance of Lama, Igor in Borodin’s Prince Igor, Yunden in Damdinsuren’s Among Three Saddest Mountains, Valentine in Gounod’ Faust, Tonio in Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci Il Prologo, Don Giovanni in Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Count in Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, Papageno in Mozart’s The Magic Flute, Aleko in Rachmaninov’s Aleko, Figaro in Rossini’s Il Barbiere di Siviglia, Genghis Khan in Sharav’s Genghis Khan, Frank in Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, both Onegin and Zaretsky in Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, Eletsky in Tchaikovsky’s The Queen of Spades, Amonasro in Verdi’s Aida, Count di Luna in Verdi’s Il Trovatore, both Baron and Giorgio Germont in Verdi’s La Traviata, and Rigoletto in Verdi’s Rigoletto.

Aryuna Tsedenjapova, Mezzo-soprano

Mezzo-soprano Aryuna Tsedenjapova was born in Ulan-Ude, Russia. She graduated from the Music and Dance College of Ulan-Ude in 2001, and the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2008 (class of Professor Mrs. Dashimaa).

Her repertory includes such roles as: Carmen and Mercédès in Bizet’s Carmen, Second Lady in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte, Singer in B. Damdinsuren’s Three Dramatic Characters, Poor Lady in Bilegjargal’s Lama’s Tears, Prince Orlofsky in Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Maddalena in Verdi’s Rigoletto, Olga in Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, Sokhatai in B. Sharav’s Chinggis Khaan, and Verdi’s Messa da Requiem.

Bayart Dash-Yeichil, Mongolian Traditional Dancer

Bayart graduated as a modern dance teacher from the Music and Dance College and the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2008.

He has been a dancer of the Ulaanbaatar Musical Ensemble since 2011, a dance instructor in the Mongolian traditional dance ensemble Bilegiin Ov Erdene since 2010, and a dancer in the national ensemble of music and dance Tumen Ekh from 2006-2010, the Center of Culture of Namyanju, Korea from 2005-2006, and the National Folk and Dance Ensemble of Mongolia in 2005.

Naran Surenjav, Pop Singer

Naran Surenjav is a popular singer and songwriter from the Hovsgol Lake highlands of Mongolia. Known for her soulful voice, Naran has already recorded 11 solo albums. Her recent song, "Welcome to My Heart", was recorded in Mongolian, English, Chinese, Russian, and Japanese. Naran performs extensively throughout Asia, but she loves a global audience, and has performed at concerts in dozens of countries including France, Japan, Hungary, Turkey, Korea, Bulgaria, and the United States. Naran is also a lifelong student of art and music, with a Bachelor's Degree in Fine Arts and Acting, and a Master of Art Management from the Chinese Central Academy of Drama in Beijing.

Cong Zhao

Cong Zhao is a world famous Pipa (Chinese lute) player. As a musician, dedication to Pipa has rewarded her with top prizes in national competitions. As a teacher, deep love for teaching has won her awards of education.

Cong Zhao was born in a family of musicians. She studied Pipa with her mother at very early age, and developed an extraordinary interest in this ancient Chinese instrument. At the age of 13, she won the First Prize in the Jilin Provincial Competition for Traditional Instrumental Music. At the age of 16, she won the Second Prize in the National Competition. In 1996, she entered the Central Conservatory of Music for her excellent performance, and followed Professor Guanghua Li, a renowned music educator in China. In 1998, Cong Zhao held her first solo concert in Beijing. After graduating in 2000, she won the First Place in a professional qualification test hosted by the Ministry of Culture and was then recruited as First Pipa Soloist in the Central Orchestra for Chinese Music in Beijing. She was later elected as a committee member of Young Excellent Artists by the Chinese Culture Ministry.

Cong Zhao has toured some 20 countries with a dozen of state leaders watching her performances and her music echoing on world-famous stages. In August 2000, she toured the United States and performed in the headquarters of United Nations. In November 2000, she accompanied the Ensemble in France and participated in the “China Cultural Season in France”. In February 2002, she toured in 13 Spanish cities and in April, she toured Japan and gave performances in conjunction with the 30th anniversary of the normalization of China-Japan diplomatic relations. In June, she performed in the “China Cultural Season” in Athens, Greece; In October, she played in the Egypt Music Festival. In October 2004, she accompanied Mr. Jintao Hu, the president of China, in his visit to Ukraine and performed for eight other presidents. In February 2005, she visited Denmark and was warmly welcomed by the Danish Princess in person. In July of the same year, she was invited as a unique Chinese representative artist to perform in Korean International Music Festival. In November, she performed in a four-woman group with Richard Clayderman and toured in Asia.

From Lincoln Centre to Tokyo Concert Hall, from Carnegie Music Hall to Champs Elysees Theatre, from Athens Acropolis theatre to Amsterdam Music Hall, Cong Zhao has conveyed her understand of Chinese traditional music as well as her confidence and smile to every audience member who loves her beautiful Pipa sound. Her innovative Pipa was recognized as a patent. Her CD album Carman was distributed worldwide. Her latest production Dance in the Moon was made in Denmark. She embraces Pipa with great sentiments and spreads traditional Chinese music with deep patriotism.

Davaadorj Myagmarsuren, Tenor

Tenor Davaadorj Myagmarsuren was born in Khuvsgul Province, Mongolia. He graduated as an opera singer from the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2009 (class of Professor Mr. G. Khaidav). Since 2012 he has been a soloist of the State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet of Mongolia.

He has performed on stage in numerous roles, including Parpignol in Puccini’s La Bohème, the Messenger in Verdi’s Aida, Dr. Blind in Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Jamukha in B. Sharav’s Chinggis Khaan, Go Lin in Luvsansharav’s Khan Eagle, the Merchant in Bilegjargal’s Lama’s Tears, the Armored Man in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte, the Citizen in Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, Gastone in Verdi’s La Traviata, Goro in Puccini’s Madama Butterfly, and Verdi’s Messa da Requiem.

Domog, Folk Music Band

Domog ("legend") was established in 2006 and is comprised of five musicians and throat singers. Domog won the First Prize in the World Championship of Folklore in Nessebar, Bulgaria in 2013, and the Grand Prize of International Professional Musicians in Wien, Austria in 2013.

The band members are: Bazarbaani Bat-Orchih, fiddler and throat singer; Dorjnyam Shinetsog-Geni, fiddler and throat singer; Batjargal Enkhsaikhan, fiddler and throat singer; Gombo-Ochir Purevdorj, great fiddler and throat singer; and Tumurbat Oyunbat, musician.

Erdenejargal Erdenebat, Ballet Dancer

Erdenejargal was born in Arvaikheer, Uvurkhangai province of Mongolia and graduated as a ballet teacher in 2009 and director of ballet in 2012 from the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Since 2008, he has been a demi-soloist ballet dancer in the State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet of Mongolia. He received first prize in the Maying “King and Queen” competition in 2007.

Erdenejargal has performed on stage in numerous roles, including the Spanish dance, mazurka, Rothbart, and the cavalier in Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker, the four princes and cat in Tchaikovsky’s Sleeping Beauty, the duet in Khangal’s Treasure Girls, the dragon in Chuluun’s Gifted Khas, the two friends in Minkus’ Don Quixote, the cattleman and soldier in Khachaturian’s Spartacus, the two beasts in Choidog’s Choijid Tara, and the old general in Batdelger’s Whip of Heaven.

Ganchimeg Binderiya, Mongolian Traditional Dancer

Ganchimeg was born in Choibalsan of Dornod province, Mongolia and graduated as a dancer from the Music and Dance College in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2009 and the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2012. She has been a dancer in the Ulaanbaatar Musical Ensemble since 2011 and was a dancer in the Mongolian traditional dance ensemble Sarnii Chuluu in 2008-2009 and the musical ensemble Dolgio in Selenge province of Mongolia in 2010.

Jindong Cai

Jindong Cai joined the Stanford University faculty in 2004 as the first holder of the Gretchen B. Kimball Director of Orchestral Studies’ Chair and Associate Professor of Music in Performance. He is Music Director and Conductor of the Stanford Symphony Orchestra, the Stanford Philharmonia Orchestra, and the Stanford New Ensemble. He is also the Artistic Director of the Stanford Pan-Asian Music Festival, which he founded in 2005. Maestro Cai serves as the Principal Guest Conductor of the Shenzhen Symphony Orchestra in China, and of the Mongolia State Academic Theater of Opera and Ballet in Ulan Batar.

Before coming to Stanford, Professor Cai served on the faculties at the Louisiana State University, the University of Arizona, the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati, and the University of California at Berkeley. He held assistant conducting positions with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Cincinnati Pops Orchestra, and the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra.

Born in Beijing, Mr. Cai received his early musical training in China, where he learned to play the violin and the piano. He came to the United States for his graduate studies at the New England Conservatory and the College-Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati. In 1989, he was selected to study with famed conductor Leonard Bernstein at the Tanglewood Music Center, and won the Conducting Fellowship Award at the Aspen Music Festival in 1990 and 1992.

Together with Sheila Melvin, Mr. Cai has co-authored several New York Times articles on the performing arts in China and a book Rhapsody in Red: How Western Classical Music Became Chinese. The book was reviewed by The China Quarterly of Cambridge Journals, as “a delightful book. It opens up a cultural arena much neglected in scholarship on China.”

Khurelbaatar Oyunchimeg, Bass

Bass Khurelbaatar Oyunchimeg was born in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. He graduated as an opera singer from the Music and Dance College in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia (class of Professor Mrs. A. Buted). Since 2011 he has been a soloist of the State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet of Mongolia.

Khurelbaatar was the recipient of the Grand Prize in the International Opera Singers’ Competition named after Kim Bazarsadayev in Russia in 2010, as well as the Grand Prize of the International Opera Singers’ Competition named after Purevdorj, the legendary Mongolian opera singer, in 2012.

His operatic roles include Count Monterone in Verdi’s Rigoletto, Ramfis in Verdi’s Aida, Colline in Puccini’s La Bohème, Khoroldoi in Ts. Natsagdorj’s The Drifting Clouds of Faith, Angelotti in Puccini’s Tosca, Menlig in B. Sharav’s Chinggis Khaan, and Verdi’s Messa da Requiem.

Mendsaikhan Chultemsuren, Mongolian Traditional Dancer

Mendsaikhan was born in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, and graduated as a dancer from the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2012. He has been a dancer in the Ulaanbaatar Musical Ensemble since 2012 and was a dancer in the Mongolian traditional dance ensemble Sarnii Chuluu from 2010-2012.

Mongolian State Academic Theater of Opera and Ballet

Opened on May 18, 1963 with P.I.Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, the Mongolian State Academic Theater of Opera and Ballet is celebrating is 51st anniversary during its 2013-2014 season. The State Opera and Ballet Theater was officially named the State Academic Theater of Opera and Ballet in 1981.

Its repertoire is broad, encompassing more than 100 national and world classical works including 56 ballets: P.I.Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, The Nutcracker, Sleeping Beauty, Francesca Da Rimini, A.Adam’s Giselle, The Corsair, B. Asafyev’s The Fountain of Bakhchisarai, Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade, L.Delib’s Coppelia, Flames of Paris, L.Minkus’ Don Quixote, La Bayadure, Paquita, M.Ravel’s Bolero, S.Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet, Cinderella, A.Khachaturian’s Spartacus, I.Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, J.Chuluun’s Skilled Has, A.Mend-Amar’s Three hills of Misfortune, E.Choidog’s Choijid Tara, Z.Hangal’s Treasure Girls, and A.Batdelger’s Geser Nomun Khan as well as 54 operas: P.I.Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, Iolanta, Pique Dame, Ch.Guno’s Faust, W.A.Mozart’s Don Giovanni, The Magic Flute, G.Verdi’s Otello, Rigoletto, Il Trovatore, La Traviata, Aida, G.Puccini’s La Bohema, Madam Butterfly, Tosca, Turandot, G.Bizet’s Carmen, A.Borodin’s Prince Igor, G.Rossini’s Barber of Seville, G.Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, J.Strausss Die Fledermause, S.Rachmaninov’s Aleko, B.Damdinsuren’s Three Dramatic Characters, D.Luvsansharav’s Khan Eagle, L.Murdorj’s Khokhoo Namjil, Kh.Bilegjargal’s Lama’s tears, B.Sharav’s Genghis Khaan, and Ts.Natsagdorj’s The Drifting Cloud of Fate.

Funded by the Mongolian government, the Mongolian State Academic Theater of Opera and Ballet employs approximately 270 people, including a full chorus, orchestra, solo singers and dancers, a corps de ballet, composers, conductors, designers, directors, and craftsmen.

Many Mongolian artists from the theater have become major players on the world stages. Recent examples include ballet dancer Altankhuyag Dugaraa, who currently is a principal soloist of the Boston Ballet; and baritone Amartuvshin Enkhbat, who received the first prize of the Placido Domingo OPERALIA Competition in 2012, the second prize and two special prizes at the International Singing Contest Francisco Vinas in Barcelona in 2013, and the second prize and the public prize at the XIV International Tchaikovsky Competition in 2011.

Naranchimeg Shirmen, Soprano

Soprano Naranchimeg Shirmen was born in Bayankhongor Province, Mongolia. She graduated from the Music and Dance College of Mongolia in 1999, and the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2003 (class of Honored Artist of Mongolia, Mrs. Buted). She also studied at the University of Music in Italy in 2006.

Since 2003 she has worked as a soloist of the State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet of Mongolia. Naranchimeg is a 1st-prize winner of the national competition “Best roles in opera: Three dramatic characters” (Role of Nansalmaa, 2008) and winner of the “Crystal Vase” prize in the “International Opera Competition named by Linhovoin” in Ulan-Ude, Russia (2010).

Her repertory includes such roles as: Donna Elvira in Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Paj in Verdi’s Rigoletto, Papagena in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte, Leonora in Verdi’s Il Trovatore, Aida in Verdi’s Aida, Rosalinde in Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Tserenlkham in Bilegjargal’s Lama’s Tears, Norovlkham in Luvsansharav’s Khan Eagle, Nansalmaa in B. Damdinsuren’s Three Dramatic Characters, Borte and Khadaan in B. Sharav’s Chinggis Khaan, Dulmaa in B. Damdinsuren’s Road to Happiness, Naranzel in Ts. Natsagdorj’s The Drifting Clouds of Faith, and Verdi’s Messa da Requiem.

Nomgonmaa Jargalsaikhan, Mongolian Traditional Dancer

Nomgonmaa was born in Bayankhongor province, Mongolia and graduated as a ballet master from the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2011 and from the Modern Dancing School of Ulaan-Ude, Russia.

Nomgonmaa has been a dancer in the Ulaanbaatar Musical Ensemble since 2011, and the sport dance group STAR since 2008. She was a dancer in the Academic Ensemble of Folk Singing & Dancing in 2008, 2009 and 2011, a dance instructor in the Mongolian traditional dance ensemble Sarnii Chuluu in 2009, and in the dance school Sline from 2010-2011.

Norovbanzad Byambasuren, Mongolian Traditional Dancer

Norovbanzad was born in Mandal, Dundgobi province, Mongolia and graduated as a ballet dancer from the Music and Dance College in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2004. She has been a dancer of the Ulaanbaatar Musical Ensemble since 2011, a dance instructor in the Mongolian traditional dance ensemble Bilegiin Ov Erdene since 2010, and was a dancer in the national ensemble of music and dance, Tumen Ekh, from 2003-2010.

Reshi Tsering Tan

Reshi Tsering Tan is a key icon in the movement to preserve traditional music culture in Tibetan areas in China. Tsering Tan was born to a shepherd’s family on the grasslands of Maqu Town in Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Gansu Province, China. He studied vocal performance and dance at Lanzhou Northwest Nationalities University and China Central University for Nationalities.

His first music album, Shangri-la, was published in 2007 and was produced by top musicians from China and Hong Kong. It received widespread attention at home and abroad.

In 2008, Reshi Tsering Tan established the Shangri-la Folk Music Preservation Association ("SFMPA"), a non-profit organization committed to the collection, preservation and inheritance of traditional music in Tibetan areas. Taking root in local communities, The SFMPA wishes to not only protect but also to spread Tibet’s folk music tradition across the rest of the world to share this great heritage with a wider audience.

Reshi Tsering Tan’s unique music style and his outstanding charitable contributions has been the focus of both national and international media attention, such as National Geographic Magazine, Phoenix TV, the Travel Channel, and China Youth Daily among others.

Rueibin Chen

Mr. Rueibin Chen's distinguished career as an internationally-acclaimed pianist has earned him a reputation for technical brilliance, immense energy, and intense artistic expression.

He was invited to be the opening soloist in the 2010 World Expo in China, where he performed the Yellow River Concerto. Critics hailed it as the best performance of the iconic piece in its history. His masterful performances of Rachmaninoff's complete piano concertos (including the Paganini Rhapsody Op. 43) in two consecutive nights at Taiwan's National Concert Hall garnered significant critical acclaim. The performance was considered to be "the first of its kind and has left a sensational imprint in the minds of the overflowed audience." Such praise befits "one of those geniuses that come along once in twenty years." (Neue Zürcher Zeitungem)

A Chinese Austrian born in Taiwan, Chen won a total of eighteen medals, five of them gold, before the age of 20 in various international piano competitions in Tel Aviv (Rubinstein), Warsaw (Chopin), Salt Lake City (Bachauer), Athens (Callas), Vienna, Manresa, and Italy (Rome, Rachmaninoff, Bellini, and Stresa), to name a few.

Chen received his first piano lessons from his father when he was five. At the age of thirteen, he was selected by the government in a national talent search and was sent to Vienna, Austria, where he obtained a concert diploma from the Vienna Conservatory. Subsequently, he received a soloist's examination award from the Hannover Hochschule für Musik in Germany and then continued his study under the late legendary Russian pianist Lazar Berman as his only disciple of Asian descent.

In addition to his masterful artistry, Chen's humble background and the hardship he endured as a youngster growing up in Europe all by himself has inspired many young pianists, both in Asia and abroad. His unique blend of East/West sensibility, his Chinese heritage, his European upbringing and training, his modest personality and his inspiring personal story have earned him a significant following all over the world.

Saruul Bayasgalan, Ballet Dancer

Saruul was born in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and graduated as a ballet dancer from the Music and Dance College in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2007. Since 2006, she has been a soloist ballet dancer of the State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet of Mongolia. She became an Honored Worker of Culture of Mongolia in 2011.

Saruul received prizes at the 10th Asian Pacific International Ballet Competition in Tokyo, Japan in 2005; the Youth America Grand Prix in New York, USA in 2008; and the International Ballet Festival in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2011.

Saruul has performed on stage in numerous roles, including Odette, Odile and Pas de Trois in Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, Masha and the doll in Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker, Aurora and the lilac and diamond fairies in Tchaikovsky’s Sleeping Beauty, Giselle, Myrtha and Pas de Deux in Adam’s Giselle, Coppélia in Delibes’ Coppélia, Francesca in Tchaikovsky’s Francesca da Rimini, Pas de Deux in Khangal’s Treasure Girls, Urangoo in Choidog’s The Flower in the Sage Bushes, in the 7th and 11th waltz and nocturne in Chopin’s Chopiniana, Khandarmaa in Chuluun’s Gifted Khas, friends, Amor, the 3rd and 4th variations in Minkus’ Don Quixote, the friend and mazurka in Asafiev’s The Fountain of Bakhchisarai, Phrygia and the courtesan in Khachaturian’s Spartak, the pas de six and variation in Minkus’ Paquita, the duet in Choidog’s Choijid Tara, the three bluebirds and girls in Batdelger’s Geser Nomun Khaan, Adagio in Batdelger’s The Whip of Heaven, the quadruple in Minkus’ Bayaderka and the two friends and little girl in Mend-Amar’s Three Hills of Misfortune.

Stanford Chinese Music Ensemble

The Stanford Chinese Music Ensemble (SCME) is Stanford’s only official student group committed to playing a variety of traditional Chinese instruments and music. Founded in October 2011, the ensemble has already performed at various cultural and musical events, including the Stanford Chinese New Year Gala and the Pan-Asian Music Festival hosted by Stanford University. Conducted by Professor Jindong Cai, SCME strives to promote cultural exchange and awareness about Chinese culture and to expand artistic creativity at Stanford by introducing students and faculty to a unique style of music.

Stanford Symphony Orchestra

The Stanford Symphony Orchestra (SSO) is the largest on-campus student music organization, supported by the Music Department and the Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU). It presents approximately six concert programs each season. Winners of Stanford Symphony Orchestra’s annual Concerto Competition are regularly featured as guest soloists. In addition, the orchestra often collaborates with some of the world-renown artists, as well as performs in joint concerts with on-campus choral groups and the Stanford Wind Ensemble. Over the years, the orchestra has performed many major symphonic works, and premiered numerous works by Stanford composers. The SSO has visited many countries around the world. Under the direction of Maestro Cai, the orchestra has toured to Australia and New Zealand in 2005 and China in 2008 as part of Beijing Olympic Cultural Festival.

Suli Xue

One of the most outstanding Chinese-American violinists, Suli Xue enjoys an active career on today’s international music stage. A member of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, a Professor of Violin in the Thornton School of Music at University of Southern California, the Artistic Advisor of Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra, the Artistic Director of the Schoenfeld International String Competition and the former concertmaster of the Central Philharmonic Orchestra of China, Suli Xue has earned high acclaim around the world for his unique artistry.

Suli Xue graduated from the Shanghai Conservatory of Music and USC Thornton school of Music - a protégé of world-renowned violin professor, Alice Schoenfeld. He was frequently invited as a guest artist and faculty to teach and perform at International Music Festivals in United States and Europe. Recently, Suli Xue performed as a soloist with the YMF Debut Orchestra and Moscow State Symphony Orchestra for their New Year's Concert Tour. He also released two CD albums entitled Melodies of China and Golden Melodies. The albums were received with extraordinary praise and popularity in China as well as internationally.

Temuge Lkhaasuren, Traditional Mongolian Dancer

Temuge was born in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and graduated as a dance teacher from the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2012. He also attended the Sport Dancing and Refresher Course in Slyudenka, Russia in 2004. He has been a dancer in the Ulaanbaatar Musical Ensemble since 2011.

Tibetan Opera, Dance and Music Troupe of Qinghai

The Tibetan Opera, Music and Dance Troupe of Qinghai is a renowned performing troupe made up of the Qinghai Tibetan Opera Troupe and the Qinghai Performing Arts Group. Their performances have received many regional and national awards including the Golden Award of the Chinese Minority Theatrical Festival. They have previously performed in Thailand and Nepal but their appearance here at Stanford marks their North American debut. By participating in the Pan-Asian Music Festival, the troupe hopes to introduce authentic Tibetan performing arts to American audiences, and to promote cultural exchange and diversity in the arts. In their Pan-Asian Music Festival performances, they will focus on three areas of Tibetan music: folk music and dance, religious music and chanting, and Tibetan opera.

Uyanga Unushikhbayar, Soprano

Uyanga was born in Murun, Khuvsgul Province, Mongolia and graduated as an opera singer from the State University of Arts and Culture in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia in 2002. Since 2003, she has been a soloist in the State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet of Mongolia. She became an Honored Artist of Mongolia in 2013.

Uyanga has performed on stage as Donna Elvira Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Pamina in Mozart’s The Magic Flute, Mimi in Puccini’s Bogema, Violetta Valéry in Verdi’s La Traviata, Aida in Verdi’s Aida, Gilda in Verdi’s Rigoletto, Adele in Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, both Khadaan and Queen Orbai in Sharav’s Genghis Khan, Mother Hoelun in Altankhuyag’s Mother Hoelun, Tserenlkham in Biligzhargal’s Repentance of Lama, Khaliun in in Damdinsuren’s The Road to Happiness, and Tatyana in Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin.